Stroud Hospitals League of Friends donate £10,296 to support our Gloucestershire mobile cancer care unit .

Posted on by Hope for Tomorrow

The service that Hope for Tomorrow’ provides is of such benefit and value to the community of the Five Valleys that we feel privileged to help fund the weekly visit that the mobile unit makes to Stroud Hospital…”

A natural partnership

Stroud Hospitals League of Friends representatives (pictured), Dr Roma Walker (Chair), Sue Herschell and Nick Hurst, visited the Gloucestershire mobile cancer care unit, ‘Helen’, on 10th June 2021. The delegates presented a cheque for £10,296 to Nikki Budding, Corporate & Community Fundraising Manager at Hope for Tomorrow.

Supported by the people of Stroud and the surrounding district, the League provides resources to Stroud Hospitals. Funded projects include general refurbishment and provision of state-of-the art equipment, which would not otherwise be provided by the NHS. When Nikki Budding and treasurer, Will Abbot, met at Will’s local rotary club, he could see immediately how the missions of the two organisations were aligned.

Chair, Dr Roma Walker explains why the donation was made:

“Stroud Hospitals League of Friends supports a number of local charities whose work complements that of Stroud General Hospital. The service that ‘Hope for Tomorrow’ provides is of such benefit and value to the community of the Five Valleys that we feel privileged to help fund the weekly visit that the mobile unit makes to Stroud Hospital, and we hope to develop further upon this relationship  to help secure the service in Stroud for the future.”

Supporting the future of mobile cancer care

Each mobile cancer care unit costs £198 per day to keep on the road. A unit has been operating in Gloucestershire since 2007 and visits Stroud Hospital every Thursday. The League of Friends’ donation will fund future visits for an entire year. Because of their generosity, more cancer patients, like Debbie Peake, can have access to treatment in a convenient location, and be enabled to live a life that isn’t dominated by hospital visits.

Debbie, who sadly died of cancer last year, visited the Stroud unit regularly for chemotherapy. You can watch Debbie talking about how much these units mean to cancer patients here.

Debbie Peake, who received chemotherapy on oard the Stroud mobile cancer Care unit
Debbie Peake, who received chemotherapy on board the Stroud mobile cancer care unit.

Image of STroud League or Friends representatives presenting a cheque to Hope for Tomorrow